The Rescue of Enkesha

From: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Webserver <webserver2@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org>
Sent: Mon, 3 Apr 2017 23:01:09 GMT+0530
To: Anuj Tikku <anuj@tikkustravelthon.in>
Subject: The rescue of Enkesha

Dear Anuj Tikku,

This baby female elephant of approximately one year old was first spotted with a wire snare tight around her trunk on the evening of the 10th of Feb at Ngirare in the Mara Triangle, in amongst a large herd of wild elephants. Given the late hour, any hope of operating on her that evening was not possible, so the Mara Conservancy management arranged to have their Rangers monitor the herd overnight in order to be able to determine the whereabouts of the injured calf the next morning when the DSWT funded Mara Mobile Veterinary Unit working with KWS Veterinary Officer Dr. Campaign Limo could be called to the scene.  During the night the herd moved to a forested area making it difficult to perform an operation in order to relieve the baby of the ghastly snare which was severing her trunk.  The Mara Elephant Project’s helicopter was called upon and Pilot Mark Goss was able to gently push the herd away from the dense thicket into more open terrain. It was evident that the baby was in excruciating pain.

The calf was immobilized using 1mg Etorphine hydrochloride delivered in a 1.5ml Dan- Inject dart from a vehicle, after which it took ten minutes for the drugs to take full effect. Meanwhile the mother was kept away to allow examination of the wound where the tight snare had cut deep into the trunk, almost severing it completely; leaving just a small portion intact. The teams were faced with three options: amputate the trunk, attempt to reconstruct it or leave it as it was.  However none of these options could be undertaken under field conditions since constant monitoring and medication would be needed, added to which the calf would need to be watered and fed during recuperation.  After much deliberation and consultation between the Mara Management and the KWS Vet, it was decided to capture her and transfer her to the DSWT Elephant Orphanage in Nairobi for possible surgical intervention. The wound was thoroughly cleaned and temporarily reconstructed before the baby elephant was airlifted to the DSWT Orphanage in Nairobi for further care. She was given 20mgs Dexamethasone sodium anti-inflammatory intravenously and another 20mgs intramuscularly to ease pain and avoid shock but by the time she was on the plane the baby elephant was again fully conscious in transit.  Of course taking a calf from its mother is never a decision taken lightly by the Kenya Wildlife Service, but it was felt that there was little option if this baby was to remain alive with an intact trunk.

The following day, a three hour operation was performed with three Vets in attendance in order to stitch together this little calf’s trunk.  The operation went well, but despite being heavily sedated for the days afterwards, she set about trying to dismantle all the painstaking stitching that has been done.  An elephant’s trunk is said to have 40,000 muscles, divided into as many as 150,000 individual units, and the constant contracting, expanding, wiggling and squirming, makes it very challenging to keep sutures in place.  It transpired that on the second day following the operation, “Enkesha”(as the baby was named) had managed to pop all her stitches, so we were back in square one!  Amputation of the trunk was considered but we ruled that out, mindful that the tip of the trunk is extremely important when it comes to picking up food, and she would need her trunk to survive in the wild particularly through harsh dry seasons.  Any further operation was also ruled out given that she had already had two in quick succession, and another could risk her life, since the revival drug was still in her system, meaning that there was the risk that she may not be able to be brought round again following further immobilization.

We have since worked extremely hard to keep Enkesha happy and engaged, ensuring that she is kept infection-free so that natural healing can progress.   Amazingly her wound is healing well although it is a slow and painstaking journey, and we don’t anticipate that it will mend entirely, but at least part of it has knitted together again making the original gaping hole much smaller than previously. During the time that the wound was so painful, we were able to give her both milk and water by mouth so her body condition did not deteriorate dramatically.  In all, Enkesha’s improvement has been remarkable, and the ability to use what is left of her trunk has exceeded our expectations.

Snaring of wildlife for bush meat poaching on the fringes of the Mara happens, and the Mara Conservancy works hard to prevent such practices with very efficient anti-poaching scouts working day and night. It would be one of these snares, most likely set to ensnare a herbivore, that indiscriminately entangled this baby calf.  When she struggled the snare would have wrenched taught and eventually, in her case, she managed to pull free from the anchor point, but not before she had a wire tourniquet severing her trunk.  It had been there for some time before she was first sighted and helped, and it was this cruel twist of fate which robbed her of her family, but thankfully not her life.  We feel sure she will mend in the fullness of time, enough to live a totally viable wild life once more.

The story and images of her rescue can be viewed by clicking this link:
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To Foster Kuishi please click on this link:
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To make a general donation please click on this link:
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Most Sincerely,

Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.
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Give something small this Christmas for something BIG

We would like to thank you sincerely for your support this year as one of our wonderful foster parents. Our work would simply not be possible without the help of people like you and we’re pleased to let you know that LENANA continues to do well in our care thanks to your support. It’s now very much that time of year where we all start thinking about gifts we can buy for loved ones. Slippers, soaps, ties, perfumes, those small gifts that will surprise and delight family and friends. So we wanted to share our gift idea with you! The price tag is just $50. And it’s a BIG gift! The elephant is the biggest land animal on the planet. But the species sadly can’t face down ivory poaching and human-wildlife conflict on its own. By gift fostering a baby elephant for your loved one, you can make a BIG difference to a little orphaned baby elephant, a BIG difference to the future of the species and a BIG difference to the person you bring into the world of helping orphaned elephants live their dreams. Please watch our video to see how your gift helps the baby elephants

As you might have read in your monthly updates from us, we are now caring for 32 milk dependent elephant orphans at our Nursery alone. It’s been a year of highs and lows, and if you follow us on Facebook or Instagram, you’ll know we were thrilled to see four new elephant babies born to ex-orphans in 2017, we grew our Anti-Poaching teams to ten and we launched our new Canine Unit, all thanks to our supporters. People like you. Our aim is to continue to be able to hand rear any orphan infant elephant (rhino or giraffe!) who need us and then to protect them throughout their lives, which is an expensive and long term commitment. This is your chance to give a gift which is truly unique to someone you love. Whether a child, partner or relative, you could put a big smile on the face of a loved one and be helping to make a BIG difference to that elephant’s life at the same time. This is a gift of love, understanding and involvement in the conservation of an endangered baby animal and the orphan you choose gets the BIGGEST gift of all, life. It’s easy to do, and you can see a list of the orphans in our care who you could foster by following the link below

http://thedswt.org/christmas-foster

You could look for a rescue story that touches your heart, or maybe match up an age or birthday. Your gift would include, via email: A personalised fostering certificate, Monthly email updates on your selected orphan and the project, Monthly water colour by CEO Angela Sheldrick, Access to special content, including videos and photos.

Being a part of the DSWT foster family yourself, we hope you feel and agree that foster parents play a very important part in saving these beautiful animals. Every person that fosters an elephant and gives a little something, helps us to make a BIG difference for the elephants we all love. We wish you a wonderful festive season, one full of happiness, and we hope your Christmas dreams come true!

Most Sincerely,

Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.

http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org


The Rescue of Malkia

From: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Webserver webserver2@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

Sent: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 05:07:33 +0530

To: Anuj Tikku anuj@tikkustravelthon.in

Subject: The rescue of Malkia

Dear Anuj Tikku,

Walking the plains of Tsavo for many years has been a regal old lady, always easily recognised by her distinctive ivory.  This year however, the dry season has been long and harsh and with poor April/May rains, it proved too much for this aging female elephant, who was found dead with a young calf by her side.

Elephants have six sets of teeth to last them a lifetime, and as the years progress new sets come through, however once they are on their very last set of teeth these get worn over time, and there is nothing like a brutal dry season to amplify this problem.  We believe this is what happened to this beautiful matriarch.

A driver from Tsavo Trust first reported the situation to the DSWT funded Mobile Veterinary Unit’s Dr. Poghon, when they found the mother recumbent on the windswept Dika plains, withered and gaunt and in extremely poor body condition, but with no evidence of any wounds or injuries.  Her family stood vigil as the DSWT’s Rescue Team together with KWS rangers lifted her to her feet multiple times.  Sadly, she was unable to stand and just crumpled to the ground each time.  It was clear her life force was ebbing away and it would be necessary to rescue her young milk dependent calf, approximately six months old, who already was undernourished, presumably as a result of her mother’s compromised condition and lack of milk.

This old queen of the plains was humanely euthanized to save her the indignation and suffering of being torn apart by predators, whilst her baby was rescued as night approached and was then driven to the Voi stockades where she was placed in one of our taming stockades.  She had greens carefully cut for her which she fed on throughout the night, and Keeper Julius slept in the stockade bunk-bed close to her, to keep her company.  The presence of an interested army of dependent Voi elephants surrounding her stockade helped settle her as they rumbled in low tones, comforting and reassuring her.  She even slept for a while having endured quite the ordeal; how long her mother had been in a collapsed state before being discovered is unknown.

We have called this gorgeous little girl Malkia, which means ‘queen’ in Swahili, in deference to her lost mother, who for sure walked the Tsavo plains even in David Sheldrick’s time, when he was warden of Tsavo some 40 years ago.  Considering her impressive ivory, she was lucky to have lived out a long and full life.  Now it is our responsibility to look after her precious baby until she too can walk the same plains in the fullness of time as a wild elephant once more.

In the meantime, both lifesaving milk and tender care and attention is necessary to save a calf, so a rescue aircraft was immediately dispatched the next morning on the 17th of September with our Nursery Keepers on board, to collect the baby and bring her to the Nursery for the care that we are able to administer here. When the Cessna Caravan aircraft landed on the Voi airstrip our Voi Keepers were already there prepared and ready with the baby, eager to load her quickly so as not to delay.  Her screams however attracted a wild herd passing by the airfield at the time and a wild matriarch was insistent on rescuing the distressed baby.  So much so that her agitated herd were fast approaching the stationary aircraft on the airstrip.  The DSWT driver had to position the Landcruiser vehicle between the wild herd and the loading party so as to prevent a disaster from unfolding.  This herd is not her family herd, as she was orphaned many miles away from the Voi airfield.

The baby was prepared for the flight, laid on a mattress, placed on a canvas stretcher so she could be ably lifted into the back of the plane, which had already had the seats removed allowing for ample space for her to lie recumbent throughout the 1 hour flight with a Keeper by her side.  She was hydrated with a drip for the duration of the flight and arrived safely at the Nursery by 1.30pm in the afternoon.  She immediately fed on milk for the first time since being rescued, which was a relief, but she did look exceptionally tired and was ready to lie down on the soft hay of her stable to sleep.

Malkia has thrived in the Nursery, aided by her forceful nature.  She is a very determined and mischievous little girl, whose presence here has certainly been felt. Despite being so young when rescued, and under such sad circumstances, she has settled fast; loving and affectionate to her Keepers from the outset.  Malkia and her little friend Esampu have become extremely greedy and vociferous at meal times, with every feeding time accompanied by noise and barging!   Despite being so small they can be extremely disruptive giving the Keepers quite the run around.  We are happy to report that Malkia has assimilated into Nursery life seamlessly and appears extremely happy and content amongst the other orphans and her now much loved human family.

The story and images of his rescue can be viewed by clicking this link:

http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/asp/orphan_profile.asp?N=361

To Foster Malkia please click on this link:

https://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/asp/foster.asp

To make a general donation please click on this link:

https://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/is/donate_now.asp

Most Sincerely,

Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.

http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org


February update from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

From: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Webserver <webserver2@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org>
Sent: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 01:06:02 GMT+0530
To: “anuj@tikkustravelthon.in” <anuj@tikkustravelthon.in>
Subject: February update from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

3/16/2017 3:35:43 PM

Dear Anuj Tikku,

We might be best known for our work to hand raise orphaned elephants and rhinos at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust but our brand new 2016 Annual Newsletter offers the chance to read about all of our life-saving work across Kenya, which is funded entirely through donations from our supporters and foster parents alike.

Showcasing key achievements from last year and featuring messages from our Founder, Dr Dame Daphne Sheldrick, along with a selection of beautiful photography, you can read our 2016 Annual Newsletter here: thedswt.org/annual-newsletter-2016.

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and throughout that time, we have been called to countless orphan animal rescues. This lifesaving work is the inspiration behind the words and music for ‘Sacred Eyes’, which has been released this year as we celebrate 40 years protecting Kenya’s wildlife. You can watch the beautiful and emotive film that we created to accompany the song on our YouTube channel and if you choose to download Sacred Eyes, please know that 100% of the proceeds will be directed towards our work: //prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=www%2Ethedswt%2Eorg%2Fsacred%2Deyes&rediffng=0

Below is our Orphans’ Project overview, where we briefly touch on the monthly goings-on of the 87 milk dependent orphaned elephants currently in our care between our four units.  To read about your specific FOSTERED ORPHAN in more detail and view their pictures, please click the link at the bottom of this email which will take you to our Keepers’ Diaries, written by our Keepers at each unit.

You can also keep up to date with more stories and photographs from the DSWT throughout the month by following us on Facebook: //prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=www%2Efacebook%2Ecom%2Fthedswt&rediffng=0, Instagram: //prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=www%2Einstagram%2Ecom%2Fdswt%2F&rediffng=0, Twitter: //prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=www%2Etwitter%2Ecom%2FDSWT&rediffng=0 and on Snapchat: thedswt.

Nairobi Nursery

This month, we welcomed Ukame to our foster family, who was orphaned due to drought in Southern Kenya and had spent three days alone without food, water or company after failing to join other elephant herds. When it became clear she would succumb to exhaustion and dehydration without help, we stepped in to rescue her and immediately gave her the intensive care and love of a new family she desperately needed.

At two and a half years old, Ukame is one of the older members of our Nursery herd but she has a very gentle nature and loves to take care of the younger orphans. You can watch Ukame’s rescue and get to know her here: //prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=www%2Ethedswt%2Eorg%2Fukame&rediffng=0.

Ukame isn’t alone in her desire to nurture the younger babies, a characteristic we more often see in the female elephants whilst boys tend to be more boisterous. Nonetheless, as lots of our foster parents will know, each orphan has their very own unique personality with specific likes and dislikes that can change on a whim – whether it’s deciding their friend’s identical greens look much tastier, like Ambo did this month, or testing a newcomer’s resolve like Lasayen did with Ukame.

To read about the different adventures and personalities of our Nairobi orphan herd, as well as a surprise visit from our old friend and wild living ex-orphan rhino, Solio, please access the Nursery Summary: //prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Esheldrickwildlifetrust%2Eorg%2Fasp%2Fkeepers%5Fdiary%2Easp&rediffng=0

Ithumba Reintegration Unit

With ongoing hot and dry weather, our field teams have been busy topping up the Ithumba Stockade water troughs and mud bath with the help of our bowsers, mobile water tanks that ferry water from waterholes in Tsavo, DSWT managed boreholes and the Tiva River. This constant supply of water has been much in demand, enticing up to 100 wild elephants a day and several Ex Orphan herds, including Olare’s herd who have been on their usual walkabout the past three months. To be surrounded by so many elephants, wild and wild living orphans, is testament to the incredible support we enjoy from foster parents like yourself who help to fund our Orphans’ Project but also our Anti-Poaching and Aerial Surveillance projects to keep them safe.

With so many wild elephants about, there have been plenty of learning opportunities for the dependent juniors, who are very deferential towards their older peers.  Bomani and Teleki are among those who have felt the call of the wild recently and the duo even struck out on their own one day, but returned back to the herd in the evening after the Keepers located them. Behaviour like this is all part of a reintegration journey that can span many years but will, one day, lead to a happily ever after for these orphans who lost so much at such a young age.

To catch up with the Ithumba orphans and the Ex-Orphan herds in more depth, you can read the summary here: //prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Esheldrickwildlifetrust%2Eorg%2Fasp%2Fkeepers%5Fdiary%2Easp&rediffng=0

Voi Reintegration Unit

Ex Orphan bulls Lolokwe and Laikipia were among the many Ex Orphans who visited the Voi stockade this month, both looking very handsome. Lolokwe especially inspires awe among the junior dependent orphans, who surround him and pat him with their trunks whenever he mingles with their group.

Unlike our Ithumba Reintegration Unit, which is home to mostly male dependent orphans, our Voi Reintegration Unit is made up of mostly female elephants and has characteristically been led by orphans who tend to be very protective of ‘their’ family. Kenia and Ndii, who are the leaders of the dependent juniors, are no different and when Lesanju and Emily and their respective Ex Orphan herds visited this month, Kenia and Ndii were quick to shepherd ‘their’ herd away to browsing grounds at the first given opportunity as per usual.

As well as keeping the Voi Stockade water troughs topped up with water, late this month we also excavated the mud bath to make more room for our herd to enjoy their aquatic activities.  Lentili, Bada and Mudanda are among those who have taken to the upgraded mud bath enthusiastically, with Naipoki even inventing a game that involved sliding down the new soil banks into the water!

To catch up on more fun and games had by the Voi herd, please click to the Keepers Diary. //prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Esheldrickwildlifetrust%2Eorg%2Fasp%2Fkeepers%5Fdiary%2Easp&rediffng=0

Umani Springs Reintegration Unit

The big girls of our Umani Springs herd have kept their Keepers very busy this month, very often as a result of their mischievous behaviour! For instance, despite there being plenty of browse in the forest, Lima Lima, Zongoloni and Quanza pulled down lucerne bales from the storage area to feast on, whilst Sonje managed to pull down the guttering from her stockade ‘bedroom’ and gave it a good kick about.

Meanwhile, Ngasha and Faraja decided to mount their very own ‘great escape’ one evening but didn’t make it very far, turning tail the minute they found themselves outside the stockade compound.

Meanwhile, the eldest of the orphan herd, Murera, is becoming more and more independent and even showed signs of wanting to spend a night outside alone this month. Despite this budding independence, she is still very eager for her milk, much like the rest of the herd.

The Umani orphans have enjoyed the company of numerous wild elephants this month, with their special friend ‘Ndugu’ remaining close to home and introducing them to new wild friends.

To catch up on the rest of the month’s activities at Umani, which was characterised by lots of wild elephant interactions, please click here: //prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Esheldrickwildlifetrust%2Eorg%2Fasp%2Fkeepers%5Fdiary%2Easp&rediffng=0

Please find a link to the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust’s February Keeper’s Diary should you want to keep abreast with your fostered elephant NDOTTO

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Also you will find attached a water colour painted by Angela Sheldrick for you to print off and keep.

We thank you for your valued support.

If you wish to renew or add an additional donation to your fostering of (NDOTTO), please use this link below:
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Most Sincerely,

Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.
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The Rescue of Kuishi

From: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Webserver <webserver2@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org>
Sent: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 02:36:22 GMT+0530
To: Anuj Tikku <anuj@tikkustravelthon.in>
Subject: The rescue of Kuishi

Dear Anuj Tikku,

On the 28th November, just as expectant clouds promised more hoped-for rain to relieve the drought that had gripped Tsavo National Park, the pilot from the Tsavo Trust sighted a tiny elephant calf standing beside her collapsed mother on the plains near Aruba.  Although some rain had fallen recently, it had come too late for the mother, who had obviously been struggling for a long time evidenced by the bare earth that surrounded while her desperate baby helplessly stood by her side.  This sighting was immediately reported to the DSWT/KWS funded Mobile Veterinary Unit headed by Dr. Poghon, and together with Keepers from our Voi stockades, the rescue teams proceeded to the scene, having been given coordinates by the Tsavo Trust Pilot.

Upon arrival it seemed likely that the calf’s mother had succumbed to the effects of the past brutal dry season and was dying of starvation for she was barely breathing and too far gone to get to her feet and retrieve,  her emaciated calf, of approximately l0 months old, bravely standing  by her side protecting her.   The calf was still feisty, although thin, for she too had clearly suffered the effects of the drought, having been deprived of her mother’s milk.  The Rescue Team worked hard to try and save the collapsed mother, but sadly she slipped away, so their attention then turned to capturing the young calf.   This was accomplished  swiftly after which she was restrained and placed in the back of a Landcruiser and brought safely back to the Voi stockades to await the arrival of a rescue aircraft from Nairobi to ferry the baby to the DSWT Nairobi Nursery.

Named “Kuishi” (meaning “to live” in Swahili), the baby arrived during our Foster Parents’ visiting time at 5.00pm, very thin but still with sufficient strength to put up a fight and with a strong will to live.   Having been comforted by other resident elephant orphans, she settled fast and it was only two short days before she was able to join the other orphans out in the forest.   She embraced her new life, relishing the abundance of food that was provided for her, since clearly during her young life this had been in short supply as she lived through a drought year, with unforgiving heat and little nourishment, as her mother struggled to stay alive.

Kuishi is an extremely lucky calf to have been rescued in time since Tsavo encompasses a vast landscape.  She is shy yet playful, but has made good friends with feisty Esampu who no doubt will be teaching her naughty ways in the fullness of time!

The story and images of her rescue can be viewed by clicking this link:
//prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Esheldrickwildlifetrust%2Eorg%2Fasp%2Forphan%5Fprofile%2Easp%3FN%3D368&rediffng=0    

To Foster Kuishi please click on this link:
//prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=https%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Esheldrickwildlifetrust%2Eorg%2Fasp%2Ffoster%2Easp%3Fnn%3D1%26G%3D%26LP%3D3232017242%2Dpic7a%2Ejpg%26addn%3D368%26N%3D368%26FN%3DKUISHI&rediffng=0

To make a general donation please click on this link:
//prolinks.rediffmailpro.com/cgi-bin/prored.cgi?red=https%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Esheldrickwildlifetrust%2Eorg%2Fis%2Fdonate%5Fnow%2Easp&rediffng=0

Most Sincerely,

Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.
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The Rescue of Tamiyoi

the_rescue_of_tamiyoi

She is called Tamiyoi, after the place from where she was found.

From: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Webserver <webserver2@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org>
Sent: Tue, 01 Nov 2016 21:15:41
To: “Anuj Tikku” anuj@tikkustravelthon.in
Subject: The rescue of Tamiyoi

Dear Anuj Tikku,

On the 16th of October 2015 we were called about a young female elephant found trapped and abandoned down a water well near Maralal in Northern Kenya. She was discovered by the pastoral Samburu community and reported to the Kenya Wildlife Service who retrieved and extracted her ensuring that we received news to action a rescue. We immediately dispatched an aircraft to the Wamba airfield, which is approximately a one hour flight from Nairobi. Once our team landed they were not only greeted by the KWS men who had rescued the calf, but also a crowd who were hard to restrain given their eager interest in the tiny baby elephant.

Amazingly this bold little calf followed the men around the airfield, seemingly not overly stressed by the presence of so many people. She even fed well before being laid on the travelling mattress and tarpaulin stretcher and with no shortage of helping hands around, she was swiftly hoisted into the aircraft and prepared for the flight. She arrived at the Trust’s Nairobi Nursery in good condition and was remarkably tame and trusting of her Keepers from the outset. How long she had been without her mother was difficult to say, but her arrival coincided with the dreaded teething phase suggesting that she was about two months old. She was named Tamiyoi after the area in which she was found.

Tamiyoi’s journey was initially fraught as we struggled to keep her alive. Whilst initially all was well, her condition plummeted during the teething process during which she was quite literally just clinging to life. One positive sign during these tough months was that Tamiyoi tried to feed on greens, and little wild berries she found in the nearby Park forest, something no other elephant of her age has done. Our Keepers were forced to pass by Tamiyoi’s berry tree each day so that she could pick up the wild fruits that had fallen, feeding on them until she was satisfied. The Keepers would also collect the berries for her, feeding them to her as and when she demanded them. It was as if Tamiyoi lacked something vital in her system, but despite our best efforts, multiple tests, and adjustments to her diet, we saw little improvement in her condition for many months during which time she frequently collapsed. Saving Tamiyoi has required a herculean effort from the whole DSWT team, but no small part has been her own extraordinary will to live. Of course, with her enchanting little ways she has stolen the hearts of all who have been involved in the fight to save her and since seeing her turn the corner around four months ago, her condition has continued to improve. That said, she still has a slightly malnutritional look about her with a more than usual rotund belly, but it has become clear that week by week her condition has been improving, her cheeks filling out and the texture of her skin recovering from the previous paper thin aspect, something that is always an indication of ill health in an elephant.

It is with great pride that we feel we can now offer Tamiyoi for fostering – a full year on from when she was rescued. Despite hundreds of people wanting to support her, we were hesitant to offer her for fostering simply because every time we thought we were ready to do so, Tamiyoi would take a worrying turn which left us having to exercise caution, never convinced that we were actually through the woods. Despite being diminutive in size at one year old, this little elephant has the steely temperament of one who knows her own mind. The love of her extended elephant family of orphans as well as a caring human ones who have cupped her life in their hands, struggling day and night to save this precious baby, has been instrumental in tipping the balance. We look forward to Tamiyoi growing into the wonderful Matriarch we feel sure she will become one day, when she will experience the joy of living wild with her own wild born family. However, in the meantime, we have the privilege of sharing these formative years, and basking in her unconditional love and obvious gratitude.

The story and images of her rescue can be viewed by clicking this link.

To Foster Tamiyoi please click on this link.

To make a general donation please click on this link.

Most Sincerely,
Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.
http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

 


The Rescue of Wanjala

the_rescue_of_wanjala

Named ‘Wanjala’, after the area from where he was found.

From: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Webserver <webserver2@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org>
Sent: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 23:16:44
To: “Anuj Tikku” anuj@tikkustravelthon.in
Subject: The rescue of Wanjala

Dear Anuj Tikku,

A young elephant calf approximately 19 months old was first sighted near the Trust funded Dida Harea Windmill waterhole on the southern plains of Tsavo East National Park by the DSWT maintenance team who monitor the Trust funded windmills throughout Tsavo regularly. The calf was weak and extremely emaciated and was obviously an orphan who had been without its mother’s milk for some time judging by his condition, but was accompanied by a teenage bull at the time who later ran off at the approach of the vehicle, leaving the calf alone and extremely vulnerable to predators due to his poor condition.

The maintenance team observed the calf for much of the day during which time wild elephant herds came to drink leaving the weakened calf behind who was unable to follow. The decision was therefore made to rescue it, since it was unlikely to survive the night being so vulnerable.

The Kenya Wildlife Service Senior warden of Tsavo East was informed and he called the Trust’s Voi elephant Keepers to mobilise a rescue after which the calf was duly captured with little residence due to its emaciated condition. He was a young male and was driven to the airstrip to wait for the aircraft from Nairobi which had in the meantime been arranged; this ensured the rescue was seamless with little delay. The rescued baby was prepared for the flight, hydrated throughout the journey and placed in a stockade at our Nairobi Nursery.

He was very weak and collapsed a number of times requiring emergency attention to retrieve him, but as the days passed he began to regain his strength. We think the reason for his being orphaned is a result of the brutal dry season, and drought conditions, most probably abandoned by his family simply because he could no longer keep up with the herd. He was named Wanjala after the area from where he was found.

After a week or so he had regained significant strength enough to be able to join the other nursery ele orphans and their Keepers in the forest and on the plains of Nairobi National Park and very quickly made special friends and settled into all the routines like a veteran. Over the past month we have been delighted with Wanjala’s progress, rescued literally from the jaws of death as the last remnants of his strength were ebbing away. A lovely gentle bull who has grown stronger thanks to intensive care and is back to perfect health surrounded by a new loving nurturing family, both two footed and four.

The story and images of his rescue can be viewed by clicking this link.

To Foster Wanjala please click on this link.

To make a general donation please click on this link.

Most Sincerely,
Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.
http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

 


September Update from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

september_2016_watercolour_by_angela_sheldrick

An elephant paint by Angela Sheldrick .

From: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Webserver <webserver2@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org>
Sent: Sun, 16 Oct 2016 07:41:41
To: “anuj@tikkustravelthon.in” <anuj@tikkustravelthon.in>
Subject: September update from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
10/15/2016 10:11:22 PM

Dear Anuj Tikku,

Please find the September fostering update from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. The link to your FOSTERED ORPHAN AND THE KEEPER’S DIARIES can be found at the end of this email. The diaries include stories and photographs of your chosen orphan, along with an OVERVIEW SUMMARY from each Unit.

You can join us on Facebook  and Instagram to follow our work plus interesting stories and photographs which are shared throughout the month.

THE NURSERY UNIT
In September we were able to save three orphaned elephants, and thankfully they today are all doing well. The details regarding their rescues can be found in this month’s Nursery summary as well as within the daily dairy entries
Our orphaned female ostrich, Pea, is very much an integral part of the Nursery elephant orphaned herd, and we share that unique story and some enchanting photographs depicting her special relationship with the elephants on this link.

UMANI SPRINGS UNIT
This month the wild bull we have named “Ndugu” continues to visit the Umani elephants both at the Stockades aswell as out in the wild, and is becoming much more accommodating of the Keepers. All the stories from the month are shared throughout the Umani dairies, and thankfully despite the forest being tinder dry, our orphans there remain in excellent condition.

ITHUMBA UNIT
We experienced great excitement at Ithumba early in September when our orphaned elephant Galana returned with a tiny wild- born baby. We share a short film and more details about Gawa’s birth in this update, but you can also enjoy more throughout the diaries.

VOI UNIT
Our Voi Keepers have been extremely busy this month, not just looking after their dependent orphaned herd, but also having to rescue this month’s three new orphans after reports have come their way. Some of our Voi Ex Orphans have remained close to home whilst others have wandered further afield during this dry season. 

Our Field Teams have had to be extremely vigilant during this dry period when poaching is inevitably heightened, but thankfully this year has seen less illegal activity compared to previous years, with our Veterinary Units having less cases to attend to in recent months compared to last year. Our pilots fly hundreds of hours over the vast Tsavo landscape helping to keep it safe and their September aerial report is shared here.

Please find a link to the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust’s September Keeper’s Diary should you want to keep abreast with your fostered elephant NDOTTO
Also you will find attached a water colour painted by Angela Sheldrick for you to print off and keep.
We thank you for your valued support.
If you wish to renew or add an additional donation to your fostering of (NDOTTO), please use this link.

Most Sincerely,
Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.
http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

 


 

The Rescue of Pare

the_rescue_of_pare

Named ‘Pare’, after the Pare Mountains that shadow Lake Jipe at the southern end of Tsavo West.

From: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Webserver <webserver2@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org>
Sent: Thu, 13 Oct 2016 00:49:56 +0530
To: Anuj Tikku <anuj@tikkustravelthon.in>
Subject: The rescue of Pare

Dear Anuj Tikku,

On the 1st of July Angela received a phone call from Richard Bonham of Big Life regarding an orphaned elephant who had been reported by the community of the Rombo Group Ranch, abutting the Tsavo West National Park and close to the Tanzanian border.  It was awhile before the Big Life scouts could reach the location where the calf was last sighted to confirm the situation, and due to the dense bush and lack of roads, they were unable to locate the baby again that day.  The rescue was postponed until the next morning, when, thankfully, the little bull appeared again and the Big Life Scouts were able to rescue him.

He was well under a year old, and had actually been sighted by community members for three days prior to being retrieved, so was in a very emaciated state.  Given his weakness he was easily overpowered and captured, and lifted into the back of a Land cruiser to be driven to the Amboseli National park airstrip, a journey  which took approximately 1.5 hours, where the DSWT rescue team from Nairobi were by now already in situ.  Once at the airstrip the Nursery Keepers were able to give this thirsty little boy some much need rehydration, along with milk, before preparing him for the flight by placing him recumbent on a comfortable mattress, which lay on top of the canvas rescue stretcher.  Given his dehydrated state, he was immediately placed on IV fluids for the duration of the flight which, from Amboseli to Nairobi lasted about forty five minutes, so it was not too long before he was safely at the Nairobi Nursery where we estimated him to be approximately between 8 and 9 months old.  He was placed in a stockade filled with an abundant variety of carefully chosen soft green vegetation tied in bunches around his enclosure, and he immediately began to feed on these.

We named him Pare, after the Pare Mountains that shadow Lake Jipe at the southern end of Tsavo West.  When orphan Pare arrived at the Nursery, he behaved as if he had been here all his life, seemingly delighted and relieved to have food, company, and plenty of love and comfort. Amazingly he was totally affectionate from the outset, suckling the Keepers’ fingers and wrapping his trunk around their necks.  Pare never needed taming down – which sometimes is not a good sign, and sure enough the next day he collapsed, as is so often the case with these starvation victims.  However, thanks to swift action and IV fluids, we managed to get him back onto his feet, and most importantly, feeding once more.  Very soon he joined our baby herd out in the Nairobi Park forest, but as the weeks past his condition worsened, and it became clear he was riddled in parasites, not surprising having come from a region heavily impacted by Masai livestock. More and more we are seeing the impact of livestock on the elephant populations as they share the same areas and watering points.  Very often the parasites can prove life threatening for the elephants.  Pare’s condition remained precarious for a long time, whilst we worked extremely hard to find solutions.  During this time he was moved into the comfort of a stable at night-time since he became too weak to get back onto his feet after sleeping and always needed the help of a Keeper, who remained with him twenty four hours a day.

Thankfully, just when we were beginning to fear the worst, Pare began to rally and has become stronger and more confident.  However, he has become fearful of lying down to sleep and instead chooses to sleep standing leaning against the wooden stable walls.  We believe that this is a result of being so weak for so long and always requiring assistance from his attentive Keepers. Nevertheless, despite help always being at hand, it was obviously a frightening feeling for him; despite being able to get back up unaided after wallowing escapades in the mud bath and soil piles, the habit remains.  In the fullness of time we are confident that he will outgrow his phobia, as we watch his condition improve daily.

Pare is an extremely gentle little bull, affectionate and loving, whose rescue came not a moment too soon.

The story and images of his rescue can be viewed by clicking this link.

To Foster Pare please click on this link.

To make a general donation please click on this link:

Most Sincerely,
Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.
http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

 


 

The Rescue of Maramoja

maramoja

‘Maramoja’, which means ‘straight away’ in Swahili.

From: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Webserver <webserver2@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org>
Sent: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 22:32:26 +0530
To: Anuj Tikku <anuj@tikkustravelthon.in>
Subject: The rescue of Maramoja

Dear Anuj Tikku,

On the first of July Angela received news about an abandoned elephant first sighted by the Tsavo Trust monitoring team close to the Dida Harea plains, in Southern Tsavo East National Park. The calf was continually being rejected by the wild herds that were passing while heading to water, and having been observed for much of the day, it was clear that this was an orphan.  She was thin, weak and extremely disorientated.  The DSWT Elephant Keepers were granted permissions by KWS to mobilize a rescue and immediately headed out to where the calf was.  Despite being aged approximately eighteen months, she put up little resistance during capture, and with legs tied she was loaded onto the waiting vehicle and driven to the Voi airstrip to await the arrival of the rescue aircraft that had been arranged to ferry the calf back to the Nursery.  Given that Angela had been given advance warning to coordinate a rescue, there was not much waiting time before the plane from Nairobi landed at the Voi Park airstrip.

Thereafter the Nairobi Keepers prepared the orphan for the flight, ensuring that she was hydrated for the duration and injected with all the necessary prophylactic medication before takeoff.  The flight back to Nairobi took approximately 1 hour and throughout the journey she lay strapped down comfortably, seemingly calmed by the movement of the plane.

Once safely at the Nursery she was lifted off the back of the pickup and placed in her designated stockade; but before being unstrapped and assisted to her feet she was given a taste of milk to help encourage her to feed. Once up however, she was full of fight, the IV fluids having helped her to gain some strength.  She relished the abundant greens that had been cut and placed in her Stockade, as Tsavo at this time of the year is exceptionally dry. Throughout the night she devoured the greens hungrily, and savoured the close proximity of the other Nursery orphans in the adjoining stockades who offered her much attention and communicated with her constantly, offering reassuring rumbles.

Tentatively at first she took milk from a bucket, still too fearful to take it from a hand-held bottle, but having had a taste for it, by morning she was prepared to charge for the bottle and desperately down the contents. Daphne named this baby ‘Maramoja’, which means ‘straight away’ in Swahili.

The reason behind the name is that she was rescued on Angela’s birthday, the 1st of July, (Moja being 1 in Swahili) and prompt action having taken place the moment our teams were alerted; also because “Mara” happens to be Angela’s second Christian name.

She loved the company of the others orphans, and after a few days she was calm enough to be free to join the other Nursery orphans in the Nairobi forest.  Maramoja is a very lovely and gentle elephant, who has grown into the Nursery routines quite comfortable and thankfully is beginning to put on condition and thrive once more.  The reason for her being orphaned however remains a mystery, but her poor condition was a very clear indicator that she had been without Mum for quite some time before being rescued.

The story and images of her rescue can be viewed by clicking this link.

To Foster Maramoja please click on this link.

To make a general donation please click on this link.

Most Sincerely,
Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.
http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

 


 

Thank You for Your Generous Donation

From: The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Webserver <webserver2@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org>
Sent: Fri, 05 Aug 2016 19:34:49
To: Anuj Tikku <anuj@tikkustravelthon.in>
Subject: Thank you for your generous donation
8/5/2016 10:04:33 AM

Dear Anuj Tikku,

Thank you so much for signing up to our orphans Fostering Program and we hope you will also visit our website regularly to keep abreast with not only our work but your fostered elephant.

As a foster parent we will be sending you monthly updates with a link specific to your orphan NDOTTO to the Keeper’s Diary this way you will be able to keep in close contact with NDOTTO’s life. And from time to time Dame Daphne Sheldrick will send you additional information and photographs on the orphans project.

We are most grateful for your financial support, and in so doing giving the gift of life to an orphaned elephant.

Please click on this link to view and print your fostering certificate.

Please click on this link to view the elephant NDOTTO’s Orphan Profile.

The latest entries in the Keeper’s Diary can also be accessed.

For more information on Understanding The Orphans’ Project.

To see on a map of Kenya where NDOTTO came from.

A sample of a collectable watercolour painting by Angela Sheldrick which is received by foster parents monthly:

Most Sincerely,

Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick D.B.E.
http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

 

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